Distinguished Transport
Lecture Series (DTLS)
DTLS 2016
Professor Anming Zhang
Professor Kay W. Axhausen
Professor Eric Miller
List of Sponsors
Return to ITS Homepage

Institute of
Transport
Studies


Distinguished Transport Lecture Series 2016

Professor Anming Zhang

Full Professor in Operations and Logistics and Vancouver International Airport Authority Chair Professor in Air Transportation at the Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia (UBC)

Challenges and Opportunities of Hong Kong's Aviation Industry

Date: 20 September 2016 (Tuesday)
Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Venue: 
Wang Gungwu Theatre, Graduate House, The University of Hong Kong (Map)


Lecture Abstract

This seminar will discuss the opportunities and challenges for Hong Kong's aviation industry. Important recent developments include: 1) the 2008 global financial crisis; 2) the growth of Mainland China's aviation sector and high-speed railway network; and 3) the important infrastructure projects such as the 3rd runway at Hong Kong Airport and the Hong Kong-Macau-Zhuhai Bridge. The impacts of these developments on Hong Kong’s aviation demand and supply will be examined, and the implications for management and policy will be explored. These discussions will be based on recent academic studies on Hong Kong's air cargo demand, airport pricing strategies, and hub connectivity.

Please click <here> to download the Lecture poster and <here> to download the Lecture slides. 

About the Speaker

Anming Zhang is a Full Professor in Operations and Logistics and holds Vancouver International Airport Authority Chair Professor in Air Transportation at Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia (UBC). He served as the Chair of the Operations and Logistics Division, Sauder School of Business (2003-2005), and as the Director of UBC’s Centre for Transport Studies (2003-2004). He has been the Vice President (Academic & Program) for the World Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) since 2006. Dr. Zhang is the recipient of the “Yokohama Special Prize for Outstanding Young Researcher” awarded at the 7th World Conference on Transportation Research (WCTR) in Sydney, Australia in 1995, and of the “WCTR-Society Prize”, awarded to the overall best paper of the 8th WCTR in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1998. In June 2014, he won the “Best Overall Paper Prize” at the ITEA (International Transport Economics Association) Conference on Transportation Economics, Toulouse School of Economics, France.

Dr. Zhang has published over 120 refereed journal papers in the areas of transportation, logistics, industrial organization and trade policy. He has co-authored two recent books: Globalization and Strategic Alliances: The Case of the Airline Industry, 2000, Pergamon Press, Oxford; and Air Cargo in Mainland China and Hong Kong, 2004, Ashgate, London (Chinese editions published both in Hong Kong and Mainland China). 


Professor Kay W. Axhausen

Professor of Transport Planning at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)

How Many Cars are Too Many?

Date: 14 October 2016 (Friday)
Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Venue: Wang Gungwu Theatre, Graduate House, The University of Hong Kong (Map)


Lecture Abstract

Drawing on on-going work with A. Loder, the talk will sketch a model system able to give a first answer to this question. The work was inspired by the predicament of Singapore and its transport policy. The country's car ownership allocation system has resulted in a set of car owners for whom the politically acceptable levels of road pricing are becoming irrelevant. It is becoming harder to achieve the speed and accessibility levels which the policy wants to achieve.

The question there and in any other dense metropolitan area is then how to combine the prices for car ownership and use with public transport prices and their system capacities to achieve the speed levels and accessibilities which society wants to achieve for quality of life. Or more bluntly: How many cars are too many for the given system capacity?

The key elements of the model system envisaged are: a model of car and season ticket ownership and use driven by the respective accessibilities, a link between the multi-modal macroscopic fundamental diagram and the level of accessibility. First partial results on these elements based on Zürich and Swiss data will be presented after a discussion of the Singapore situation. The outlook will highlight the empirical and theoretical challenges ahead.

Please click <here> to download the Lecture poster and <here> to download the Lecture slides. 

About the Speaker

Dr. K.W. Axhausen is Professor of Transport Planning at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology). He holds his post in the Institute for Transport Planning and Systems of the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering. Before his appointment at ETH he worked at the Leopold-Franzens Universität, Innsbruck, Imperial College London and the University of Oxford. He holds a PhD in Civil Engineering from the Universität Karlsruhe (now KIT) and an MSc from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

He has been involved in the measurement and modelling of travel behaviour for the past 30 years contributing especially to the literature on stated preferences, micro-simulation of travel behaviour, valuation of travel time and its components, parking behaviour, activity scheduling and travel diary data collection.  One strand of his current work focuses on the micro-simulation of daily travel behaviour and long-term mobility choices (see http://www.matsim.org for details). The second strand of his work is dedicated to the evaluation of transport projects.

He was the chair of the International Association of Travel Behaviour Research (IATBR) and is editor-in-chief of Transportation and earlier of DISp, both ISI indexed journals.

A full CV with a list of recent publications can be found at http://www.ivt.ethz.ch/people/axhausen/2015-cv-kw-axhausen.pdf.


Professor Eric Miller

Professor and Director of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute

Towards the Next Generation of Integrated Urban Models

Date: 9 December 2016 (Friday)
Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Venue: Kwan Fong Lecture Theatre, Room 223, 2/F Knowles Building, The University of Hong Kong
(Map)


Lecture Abstract

Integrated models of urban transportation and land use have evolved from the pioneering models of the 1960’s and 1970’s to operational implementation in many urban regions worldwide. They are not yet, however, in routine operational use in most cities, for a variety of reasons. This presentation briefly describes the current state of the art in integrated urban models and then discusses key issues and promising options for the development of the next generation of integrated models. As has been the case throughout the history of integrated urban modelling, key challenges remain data availability, computational requirements and technical expertise. Promising opportunities, however, include massive new digital datasets, cloud computing, agent-based microsimulation methods, ever-improving theory and the urgent need to provide design guidance in the “urban century” of continuing massive urban expansion. Recent advances in the Integrated Land-Use, Transportation, Environment (ILUTE) model system under development at the University of Toronto are used to illustrate the potential of such models, in particular with respect to the important issue of assessing land value changes due to transportation infrastructure investment.

Please click <here> to download the Lecture poster and <here> to download the Lecture slides.

About the Speaker

Eric Miller has been a faculty member in the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto since 1983, where he is currently Professor and Director of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute. He served as Acting Chair of the Department of Civil Engineering during 1998-99, 2003 and 2007 and was the inaugural Director of the University of Toronto Cities Centre (2008-2012). He is also Director of the University’s Data Management Group, University of Toronto, which is responsible for the largest travel survey data collection and management program in Canada, and Travel Modelling Group, which works closely with transportation agencies in the Toronto region in improving the operational state of travel demand modelling practice in the region. He is past-Chair of the U.S. Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Travel Behavior and Values and past-Chair of the International Association for Travel Behaviour Research. He is past-Chair of the TRB Sub-Committee on Integrated Transportation – Land Use Modeling and Member Emeritus of the TRB Transportation Demand Forecasting Committee. He served on the TRB Task Force on Moving Activity-Based Approaches to Practice and the US National Academy of Sciences Committee for Determination of the State of the Practice in Metropolitan Area Travel Forecasting. He has chaired or been a member of numerous intercity travel demand modelling peer review panels throughout North America, including current membership on the California High-Speed Rail Authority’s Ridership Technical Advisory Panel. Professor Miller is the recipient of the 2009 Wilbur S. Smith Distinguished Educator Award from the Institute of Transportation Engineers and the inaugural winner of the University of British Columbia Margolese National Design for Living Award (2012). Professor Miller is the developer of GTAModel, a state-of-the-art activity-based microsimulation regional travel demand modeling system used by the Cities of Toronto and Mississauga to forecast travel demand in the Greater Toronto-Hamilton Area (GTHA) and ILUTE, an integrated land use – travel demand model system for the GTHA. He also was Principal Investigator for a major recent study by the Transportation Association of Canada “Changing Practices in Data Collection on the Movement of People”. His international experience includes transit planning in Cairo and travel demand model development in Mumbai and Hyderabad. He is co-author of the textbook Urban Transportation Planning: A Decision-Oriented Approach, the third edition of which was recently released in e-book format.