Distinguished Transport
Lecture Series (DTLS)
DTLS 2009
Professor Jean-Claude Thill
Professor Richard Allsop
Professor Mei-Po Kwan
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Transport
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Distinguished Transport Lecture Series 2009

Professor Jean-Claude Thill

Knight Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Regional Economic Competition and Containerized Freight Shipping: A Study of Regional Accessibility in the United States and Lessons for China

Date: 29 May 2009 (Friday)
Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Venue: Wang Gungwu Theatre, Graduate House, The University of Hong Kong (Map)

Lecture Abstract

Intermodalism has become one of the most significant transformations of freight transportation in the United States and across the world over the past three decades. The coupling of shipping modes has enabled shippers to more fully realize the respective time and costs advantages of respective modes. This lecture aims at finding how the intermodal freight transportation network affects the ability of regions to position themselves more effectively in the national space-economy. In particular, the opportunity to take advantage of intermodalism when shipping manufactured goods overseas may provide an essential competitive edge to a company or to an entire region engaged in world commerce. The case of domestic and international containerized freight traffic is examined because it is closely associated with contemporary forms of integration between rail shipping and trucking. The change in the freight accessibility map of the United States to domestic and foreign markets that can be ascribed to intermodal infrastructures and operations is investigated. With the help of geospatial techniques of geographic information systems, the potential impact of intermodalism in the United States is analyzed by mapping integral place accessibility measures of zip code areas. The performance of the intermodal freight network is evaluated by comparing accessibility measures based on the highway network and on the intermodal network, respectively. In studying export-led shipping activities, we particularly examine access to container terminals in North American seaports segmented by major seaboards. Implications for the U.S. space-economy are discussed and lessons for China are drawn.

About the Speaker

Professor Jean-Claude Thill is the Knight Distinguished Professor of Public Policy at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He holds a doctorate in Geography from the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Dr. Thill's multi-prong research has centered on the spatial dimension of mobility systems and their consequences on how space is used and organized in modern societies, statistical and computational methods of spatial analysis, and most recently urban land-use dynamics. Since 2008, he has been Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, and serves on the editorial boards of several other regional, national, and international journals of geography, regional science, and spatial systems. He is the Executive Director of the North American Regional Science Council. He received the 2008 David Boyce Award from the North American Regional Science Council. He has held faculty positions at Florida Atlantic University, The University of Georgia, and The State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 2006.

Please click <here> to download the presentation file.


 

Professor Richard Allsop, OBE MA PhD DSc FREng FICE FCILT FIHT FSS

Emeritus Professor of Transport Studies, University College London; Board Member of ETSC and Chairman of its PIN Programme

How Road Safety varies across Europe: A View from ETSC – The European Transport Safety Council

Date: 14 July 2009 (Tuesday)
Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Venue: Wang Gungwu Theatre, Graduate House, The University of Hong Kong (Map)

Lecture Abstract

ETSC is a Brussels-based independent organisation founded in 1993 and dedicated to the reduction of the number and severity of injuries in transport accidents in Europe. It provides an impartial source of expert advice on transport safety matters to the European Commission, the European Parliament, EU Member States and neighbouring countries. One of its current activities is the road safety performance index programme PIN, whose aim is to help EU Member States in improving road safety by comparing Member States' performance with a view to identifying and promoting best practice and encouraging the kind of political leadership that is needed to reduce the disproportionate risk of death and injury currently associated with using the roads. 

Since June 2006, national research organisations and independent researchers from 30 countries participating in the programme have been providing the best data available in their countries about a range of aspects of road safety, and these data, together with information from cross-national European sources, have been used to compare a range of aspects of performance quantitatively among the 30 countries. The results of these comparisons are communicated, with the help of commentary from experts across the 30 countries, in ways that aim both to inform all those concerned with road safety, and to influence opinion formers and policy makers as well as interested members of the public. 

The lecture will present many of the findings of this work in the context of discussion of the challenges the programme has presented in terms of the methodology of such international comparisons and the balance that has needed to be struck between scientific rigour and effective advocacy.

About the Speaker

Professor Richard Allsop has extensive experience of research, training and advisory work on road safety, traffic management and other aspects of transport policy. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and has a DSc in Engineering from UCL (University College London), where he is Emeritus Professor of Transport Studies, having been Professor since 1976 and Director between then and 1997 of what is now the Centre for Transport Studies. He has contributed extensively to road safety research and policy, including leading the production of the IHT Gudelines for Urban Safety Management, and more widely to transport research and its applications, for example in traffic signal control and in helping to lead the production of the IHT manual Transport and the Urban Environment. He is a member of the UK Government's Road Safety Advisory Panel and chairs its Statistics Group, having previously chaired the group which developed numerical advice to Ministers on the setting of the current road casualty reduction targets for Great Britain. He is a Board Member of the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC) and chairs its road safety performance indicator programme PIN, and is a Director of PACTS, the UK Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety. He has also provided inputs to road safety policy in Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand and Poland, and lectured and contributed to research in many other countries.

Please click <here> to download the presentation file.


 

Professor Mei-Po Kwan

Distinguished Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences, The Ohio State University

What about Time in Transportation Research?

Date: 11 November 2009 (Wednesday)
Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Venue: Wang Gungwu Theatre, Graduate House, The University of Hong Kong (Map)

Lecture Abstract

Transportation research has treated time largely as a one-dimensional reference system for registering when events happen. Most analytical methods that incorporate the temporal dimension to date are based on this notion of time (such as in dynamic modeling or longitudinal analysis). This presentation explores a different notion of time and its implications for transportation research. Drawing upon recent studies on accessibility and human travel patterns, it examines how time use and space-time constraints may influence human travel behavior and activity patterns in space-time. 

About the Speaker

Professor Mei-Po Kwan is Distinguished Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Ohio State University. She is Editor of the Annals of the Association of American Geographers (Methods, Models and GIS) and Associate Editor of Geographical Analysis. She received the 2005 UCGIS Research Award from the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) and the Edward L. Ullman Award from the Association of American Geographers (AAG). Kwan's research interests include geographical information science, individual accessibility in space-time, information and communication technologies, human activity patterns, and gender and ethnic dimensions of transportation.